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Presentation: A Systems Approach to Teacher Careers: Choose and Curate Toward Commitment to Capable and Committed (CCCCC) Teachers

In this presentation, Yue-Yi Hwa and Lant Pritchett propose a set of principles for teacher career policy.

Authors

Image of Yue-Yi Hwa

Yue-Yi Hwa

RISE Directorate

Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford

Event: CIES Conference 2021

Session: Underlying assumptions and competing perspectives: Examining challenges in teacher policy and practice

Presenter: Yue-Yi Hwa

Date: 26 April 2021

Location: Virtual

A Systems Approach to Teacher Careers: Choose and Curate Toward Commitment to Capable and Committed (CCCCC) Teachers

first slide of presentation from CIES on teacher careers

Click to view presentation

Last week’s CIES 2021 conference—the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society—showcased a wealth of exciting research about teaching and teachers (among many other topics).

RISE presentations about teachers included papers on teacher recruitment in Indonesia, teaching practices in Vietnam, and virtual teacher coaching in Brazil and South Africa; as well as work in progress on teacher performance pay in Pakistan, teacher unions in Indonesia, policy and stakeholder dynamics in teacher quality in Pakistan, and teacher and principal experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic in Ethiopia.

From the RISE directorate, I presented on work in progress with Lant Pritchett in which we propose a set of principles for applying systems thinking to teacher career policy. As shown in the slides, we’re currently calling this the 5Cs: choose and curate toward commitment to capable and committed teachers. In the presentation, we discuss why the five Cs matter for supporting the profession in the complex endeavour that is classroom teaching.

This paper is still under development—and, in fact, these slides have been tweaked slightly since the presentation last week. We would welcome any feedback or suggestions, as noted on the final slide.

RISE blog posts reflect the views of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the organisation or our funders.