Education Policymaking and Learning Outcomes in Indonesia’s Districts

Daniel Suryadarma of the RISE Indonesia Country Research Team shared his insights on “Education Policymaking and Learning Outcomes in Indonesia’s Districts” at the 2018 Indonesia Development Forum. His presentation took place during the INNOVATE: MARKETPLACE OF IDEAS AND INNOVATIONS session under the theme “Delivering Basic Services to Reduce Regional Disparity”. The forum was conducted by the Ministry of National Development Planning/Bappenas on 10–11 July 2018.

India: Massive Expansion in Schooling, Too Little Learning, Now What?

The Indian NGO Pratham pioneered the use of simple, face-to-face, out-of-school assessments of basic learning at a massive scale—their typical annual report covers more than 500,000 children. The ASER reports have tracked the levels and trends in learning (tragically, there has actually been learning retrogression) of children aged 5 to 14 in rural India since 2004.

Understanding the Meaning of Equity Within Education Systems

“Quality Learning for All” and its Relation with Equity in Education Systems 

UN Sustainable Development Goal 4 (SDG 4) to “Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning” raises many questions on both conceptual and practical grounds. Perhaps, one of the most important would be which indicator to use to measure progress in accomplishing it.

A Rising Tide of Access: What Consequences for Inclusive Learning and Sustainable Development in Ethiopia?

Primary enrolment has expanded dramatically in Ethiopia over the past 20 years, with the net enrolment rate for primary education increasing from 44% in 2001 to 93% in 2015. Growth has been particularly high in the emerging regions and among more disadvantaged groups who were previously left behind; this has also been accompanied by impressive poverty reduction across the country.

Information Provision Can Improve Learning Outcomes - When It Strengthens Accountability

When Pratham used simple “report cards” to provide information about learning outcomes to villages in India, the intervention largely failed. There was no improvement in attendance of children or teachers, no improvement in learning outcomes; and parents, teachers, and village education committees did not become more engaged with the schools (Banerjee et al., 2010).