EI - Dialogues in Conversation with Dr. Karthik Muralidharan, Head of Global Education Research at JPAL and member of the RISE India Country Research Team and RISE Intellectual Leadership Team

As part of the EI - Dialogues video podcast series, Pranav Kothari interviews Karthik Muralidharan, Head of Global Education Research at JPAL, RISE India Country Research Team member, and RISE Intellectual Leadership Team member. In this talk, Muralidharan breaks down what research for social impact is, the role of research to inform policy, and the role of independent evaluations and assessments in saving money, time, and effort.

Improving School Performance through School Ranking: The Double-Edged Sword of Accountability

Despite the appeal to improve school performance through strengthened accountability, there is concern that such efforts could distort behavior if the stakes are high: schools and teachers could teach to the test, neglect unrewarded activities, or simply cheat. As a result, a number of countries (e.g., Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Pakistan) have turned to low-stakes accountability such as publicizing information, or report cards, about school performance.

EI - Dialogues in Conversation with Dr. Rukmini Banerji, Pratham CEO and RISE Intellectual Leadership Team Member

As part of the EI - Dialogues video podcast series, Dr. Rukmini Banerji, CEO at Pratham and RISE Intellectual Leadership Team member was in conversation with Pranav Kothari, Vice President of Large Scale Education Programs at Educational Initiatives.

Trained as an economist in India, Dr. Rukmini Banerji completed her BA at St. Stephen’s College and attended the Delhi School of Economics. She was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University and earned her PhD at the University of Chicago.

Three Years after SDG Adoption: It's Time for Action on Learning Data

“Do kids in developing countries need less reading and math skills than OECD Kids?” This question did not appear on the agenda at a three-day workshop recently organized by USAID. It was not even articulated. But the entire event—rather opaquely titled: “Linking Assessments to a Global Standard with Social Moderation”—was predicated on the assumption that some new global standards were needed because the definitions of basic reading and math skills used by the OECD are too unattainable for many/most developing countries. If that sounds horribly retrograde and paternalistic, it is.